Go


Latest Discussions [more]
  1. Re: Neglected Labrador in Jade Hills, Kajang by May0305

  2.  New 
    Lost small black poddle, bobby by hiouzkey

  3.  New 
    2 pedigree dogs suffered & died in Wawasan, Puchong by May0305

  4.  New 
    Having a dog in Johor Bahru Condominium by chewy

  5. Re: Healthy active puppy for adoption by Administrator

  6. Re: Four cute kittens and mom for adoption 😻 by Administrator

  7. Re: Animal Abuse by Prestine

  8.  New 
    Healthy active puppy for adoption by HumanVK

  9. Re: Found 3 Litters of Puppies in Melaka! by Maneki Neko

  10.  New 
    Small brown poodle found in sri damansara by alice1605


Pet Knowledge Library

Library > All About Dogs >

Share |
 Facebook  Twitter  Blogger

Parvovirus
2 votes
[ rate this article ]

Canine parvovirus is a highly contagious viral disease that can produce a life-threatening illness. Make sure your dog is properly vaccinated.

Submitted by PetFinderAdmin on 2010-10-29


What Is Parvovirus?
 
Canine parvovirus is a highly contagious viral disease that can produce a life-threatening illness. The virus attacks rapidly dividing cells in a dog’s body, most severely affecting the intestinal tract. Parvovirus also attacks the white blood cells, and when young animals are infected, the virus can damage the heart muscle and cause lifelong cardiac problems.


What Are the General Symptoms of Parvovirus?

The general symptoms of parvovirus are lethargy, severe vomiting, loss of appetite and bloody, foul-smelling diarrhea that can lead to life-threatening dehydration.


How Is Parvovirus Transmitted?

Parvovirus is extremely contagious and can be transmitted by any person, animal or object that comes in contact with an infected dog's feces. Highly resistant, the virus can live in the environment for months, and may survive on inanimate objects such as food bowls, shoes, clothes, carpet and floors. It is common for an unvaccinated dog to contract parvovirus from the streets, especially in urban areas where there are many dogs.


How Is Parvovirus Diagnosed?

Veterinarians diagnose parvovirus on the basis of clinical signs and laboratory testing. The Enzyme Linked ImmunoSorbant Assay (ELISA) test has become a common test for parvovirus. The ELISA test kit is used to detect parvovirus in a dog’s stools, and is performed in the vet’s office in about 15 minutes. Because this test is not 100% sensitive or specific, your veterinarian may recommend additional tests and bloodwork.


Which Dogs Are Prone to Parvovirus?

Puppies, adolescent dogs and canines who are not vaccinated are most susceptible to the virus. The canine parvovirus affects most members of the dog family (wolves, coyotes, foxes, etc.). Breeds at a higher risk are Rottweilers, Doberman pinschers, Labrador retrievers, American Staffordshire terriers and German shepherds.


How Can Parvovirus Be Prevented?

You can protect your dog from this potential killer by making sure he’s up-to-date on his vaccinations. Parvovirus should be considered a core vaccine for all puppies and adult dogs. It is usually recommended that puppies be vaccinated with combination vaccines that take into account the risk factors for exposure to various diseases. One common vaccine, called a “5-in-1,” protects the puppy from distemper, hepatitis, leptospirosis, parvovirus and parainfluenza.

Generally, the first vaccine is given at 6-8 weeks of age and a booster is given at four-week intervals until the puppy is 16-20 weeks of age, and then again at one year of age. A puppy’s vaccination program is not complete before four months of age. Older dogs who have not received full puppy vaccination series may be susceptible to parvovirus and should also receive at least one immunization. Consult with your veterinarian about how often your dog will need to be revaccinated.

Because parvovirus can live in an environment for months, you will want to take extra care if there has been an infected dog in your house or yard. Some things are easier to clean and disinfect than others—and even with excellent cleaning, parvovirus can be difficult to eradicate. Parvo is resistant to many typical disinfectants. A solution of one part bleach to 32 parts water can be used where organic material is not present. The infected dog’s toys, food dish and water bowl should be properly cleaned and then disinfected with this solution for 10 minutes. If not disinfected, these articles should be discarded. You can also use the solution on the soles of your shoes if you think you've walked through an infected area. Areas that are harder to clean (grassy areas, carpeting and wood, for example) may need to be sprayed with disinfectant, or even resurfaced.


How Can Parvovirus Be Treated?

Although there are no drugs available that can kill the virus yet, treatment is generally straightforward and consists of aggressive supportive care to control the symptoms and boost your dog’s immune system to help him win the battle against this dangerous disease. Dogs infected with parvovirus need intensive treatment in a veterinary hospital, where they receive antibiotics, drugs to control the vomiting, intravenous fluids and other supportive therapies. Should your dog undergo this treatment, be prepared for considerable expense—the average hospital stay is about 5-7 days.

Please note that treatment is not always successful—so it’s especially important to make sure your dog is vaccinated.


What Are Some Home Treatment Options?

Because parvovirus is such a serious disease, it is not recommended to attempt home treatment. Even with the best veterinary care, this disease is often fatal.
When Is it Time to See the Vet?

If you notice your dog experiencing severe vomiting, loss of appetite, depression or bloody diarrhea, contact your veterinarian immediately.
What Are Some Other Health Issues with These Same Symptoms?

A puppy with a bloody diarrhea could have a parasite problem, a virus other than parvovirus, a stress colitis, or may have eaten something that disagreed with him or injured and blocked his digestive tract. It’s crucial that you see your vet for an accurate diagnosis.


What Do You Think Of This Article?


Poor

Inaccurate

Average

Good

Excellent



References:

ASPCA - http://www.aspca.org/pet-care/dog-care/dog-care-parvovirus.html


Library > All About Dogs >






Main Site
Home
Advertising
Sponsored Listings
Sign Up
Find A Pet
Share & Save Lives
About PetFinder.my
Terms & Conditions
Freebies / Starter Pack
Report Animal Abuse
Contact Us
Facilities
WAGazine
Discussion Forum
Medical Fund
Pet Food, Toys & Products
Cuteness Meter
Central News Portal
Visual Map
Knowledge Library
Microchip Directory
FurryCards
Mobile
iPhone & iPod App
Android App

Social Media
Facebook
Twitter
KindMeal
Meat-Free Dining
Meal Deals
Kind Moments
Delicious Menu

Others
World Animal Day Contest
Digi iPhone Contest
East Coast Flood Relief
It's Pawssible
Freebies
Online Store
Discussions
Blacklists & Scams



Copyright © PetFinder.my, 2008 - 2018. All rights reserved.